The late Dr. Symons has written previously of the problems and pleasures of living in western Canada and this seasonal...

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SILTON SEASONS: From the Diary of a Countryman

The late Dr. Symons has written previously of the problems and pleasures of living in western Canada and this seasonal account of the Symons' life in Silton, a small rural village in Saskatchewan, reflects a countryman's joy in natural variety and traditional values. Interspersed with observations of foxes and sparrows, elms and pasture grasses, melting snows and ripe buds, is a running commentary on what is right with Silton and what is wrong with the encroaching commercial cacophony: the bulldozing of an old school (""where once the Union Jack fluttered"") in the interests of consolidation; snowmobiles and motorized harvesting (no more ""bearded reapers""); parks and reserves which are really ""nuisance grounds""; a modern idiom which would have Romeo not ""in love"" with Juliet but ""having an emotional relationship."" And God is no longer simply with us, he's packaged. While his wife baked bread over a wood fire, Symons hauled water, read, walked and meditated and both enjoyed their home within and without doors. Pine knot prejudices from an essentially gentle and courtly man who will find empathic readers here.

Pub Date: Jan. 10, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1974