A wry wit and a luminous intelligence flavor this inquiry into perception, normal and paranormal. Haynes, editor of the...

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THE SEEING EYE, THE SEEING I: Perception, Sensory and Extra-Sensory

A wry wit and a luminous intelligence flavor this inquiry into perception, normal and paranormal. Haynes, editor of the Journal and Proceedings of the Society for Psychical Research, is firmly convinced that telepathy and psychokinesis exist, but she is not out to prove it to you or else. Hers is a gentle, widely exploratory approach, examining the findings of psychology, physiology, and medicine. Bees, for example, can see in the ultraviolet, and William Roentgen may have been a ""hyperaesthete,"" extending his visual range to include X-rays (which he described as blue-colored). Haynes notes the well-documented studies of emotional/stress factors in stunting children's growth, inducing or exacerbating disease, and even causing death-through-suggestion in Voodoo-like cults. And, perfectly willing to explore microwaves as a way of stimulating energy or the role of enzyme activation in psychic/religions healing miracles, she opts-even with those phenomena left completely unexplained--to accept rather than reject out of hand. She is perhaps at her best commenting on consequences of the paranormal, weighing the potentials for good and evil, spotting fakery, foolishness, and--most important--the harm that authoritarian personalities and psychic cultism can do. With her no-nonsense style and gift for communicating a sense of wonder and excitement, believer Haynes makes this book an invitation for further discussion among open minds, perhaps even among the most hard-nosed of rational skeptics.

Pub Date: July 5, 1977

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: St. Martin's

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1977