I'm fed up with this rat race. We grub in the ground, for what."" Thus speaks Alexander Sanotis, an Italian boy from uptown...

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THE IRRELEVANT SAINT

I'm fed up with this rat race. We grub in the ground, for what."" Thus speaks Alexander Sanotis, an Italian boy from uptown New York who made good via Harvard (which still did not improve his vocabulary) and a rich wife, Weezie. A vulgar demagogue with a ""glimpse of the power and the glory"" and an airborne ego the size of a blimp, he decides to become an Episcopalian minister even though he is an uneasy student at Union, way off rather than way out. From there he goes to a very wealthy parish in the suburbs; and then to St. James in Washington, D.C. which he decides to integrate. Actually his Negromania reaches the point where he becomes a Negro, raises funds, recruits, organizes, and demonstrates in an attempt to shatter the white image. Eventually he is denounced and defrocked.... Satire is an intellectual skill and even where applied to simpletons (viz. Candide) it doesn't work very well with clods. Sanctis could have qualified as an anti-hero, a fashionable thing to be, had he been endowed with charisma of any kind and been restrained from indulging, at tedious length, in the worst sort of rant and cant. This is intended as a satire, but it's no more than a non-thinking man's travesty of a sensitive issue.

Pub Date: Nov. 28, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966