Covering the track, the editor of Stock Car Racing Magazine weaves the history of stock-car racing in America, the work of...

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SUPERSPEEDWAY: The Story of NASCAR Grand National Racing

Covering the track, the editor of Stock Car Racing Magazine weaves the history of stock-car racing in America, the work of Bill France to establish NASCAR (National Association of Stock Car Auto Racing), and the stories of famous drivers and teams into a chronicle of the 1976 NASCAR Grand National season. Eleven chronological chapters focus in turn on a particular 1976 Grand National race, starting with the Daytona 500 in February and ending with the Los Angeles Times 500 at Ontario, California, in November. Along with the details of each we get substantial chunks of information about cars, drivers, NASCAR, and stockcar racing in general. The sport developed in the South in the Thirties when the local boys first started to soup up their engines, put on heavy tires, and go flatout on heavily banked dirt tracks. As stock-car racing grew increasingly popular, especially after WW II, these tiny dirt ovals were gradually replaced by the superspeedways, multimillion-dollar structures that, more often than not, were built by enthusiasts with wide-eyed visions of gold. The vicissitudes of the sport are traced in a folksy and serviceable (if somewhat hackneyed) prose which delivers a lot of information for fans but no second thoughts for them or anyone else.

Pub Date: Aug. 19, 1977

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Mason/Charter

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1977