One of the more prominent younger Jewish theologians undertakes here a study of ""one of the greatest theologians the world...

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MY BROTHER PAUL

One of the more prominent younger Jewish theologians undertakes here a study of ""one of the greatest theologians the world has ever produced,"" the Apostle Paul. Noting that Paul has either been slighted or rejected by many Jewish theologians heretofore, and misinterpreted by some Christian theologians, Dr. Rubenstein is involved with Paul's personal struggle and crisis. This does not imply agreement with Paul's solution or the author's identification with Paul as an individual. Paul, he finds, resolved the conflict between experience and the tradition in which he had been reared in favor of the authority of that experience; the author affirms that he himself has experienced the same struggle, arriving at essentially the same outcome. For Paul, this resolution came in his conversion, in which he became convinced that Christ had defeated death; the author's ""conversion"" came less spectacularly but just as convincingly when he gave up all hope that God would redeem him from death. On this basis the author proceeds to examine Paul's teaching and his experience, drawing heavily upon Freudian psychoanalysis and Jewish tradition to extend beyond standard Christian interpretations. Of considerable controversial interest.

Pub Date: Feb. 23, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1972