At the end of the 19th century the United States fought a sharp little war in the Philippines, first against the Spanish,...

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OFFICERS AND LADIES

At the end of the 19th century the United States fought a sharp little war in the Philippines, first against the Spanish, then against the fierce and independent Moro natives to whom fighting was the joy and end of earthly existence. This novel tells the story of Captain Douglas Warriner who leads his battalion against the Moros, whose task is made difficult by narrow-minded superior officers and by his cocky younger brother Philip who has already stolen one love from him and now tries again with the lovely Ruth St. John, a spirited girl to teaching the backward natives. Ballroom scenes alternate with scenes of jungle fighting, until the climax when Philip dies under fire and Douglas wipes out. A More mountain strong- hold where Ruth is being kept prisoner. The background provides fresh and intriguing sidelights to an interesting tale with pleasant but conventional Characters and a stirring climax in the best Wild West tradition. The sort of book which makes one wish the author had done his material more justice.

Pub Date: Nov. 20, 1958

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1958