This Piper, a Tasmanian Tom Sawyer type, moves through this story with a casual air that will hold the interest and sympathy...

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PERVERSITY OF PIPERS

This Piper, a Tasmanian Tom Sawyer type, moves through this story with a casual air that will hold the interest and sympathy or boys. Piper Creek is a modern frontier community and the population, especially the Piper family, share a rough and tumble approach to living that is made up of an easily irritated pride and a good deal of self-reliance. Bulldog Rainbird, a schoolmate, is the center of most of the incidents that make up this story. The Rainbirds lead a less than minimal existence because of their father's combined bad luck and low initiative. Bulldog instigates a shoplifting venture, takes off with some money that the family thinks Tas stole, and becomes a constant thorn to Tas generally. Nevertheless, both boys join forces to rescue Bulldog's father from a small, caved-in mine. Without overdoing it, the story underlines the stubborn family love and loyalty that operates so strongly among the Rainbirds of the world. A short glossary clears up some of the Tasmanian/Aussie slang which is a forceful primitive poetry.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Van Nostrand

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1964