The traceable pre-history of the New York and Long Island areas goes back beyond 5,000 B.C. A great deal of the digging and...

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THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF NEW YORK

The traceable pre-history of the New York and Long Island areas goes back beyond 5,000 B.C. A great deal of the digging and the dating has been done since the 1930's, establishing a record of Paleo-Indians, Archaic hunters and Woodland people to provide genealogies for the tribesmen who watched Hudson sail up the river in 1609. It is a record that has been put together from middens and graves, and the author discusses how the changing weather patterns wrought gradual changes in the living habits of the area tribes. The account stops with the invasion of civilization in the form of Dutch settlers. In its presentation of the factual information, this is an excellent book. The same sort of fictional recreations with unlikely dialogue that flawed The Archaeology of San Francisco (1965, p. 246-J84) are present, but seem briefer and more clearly separated from the non-fiction. Like the first in the series, this appeals to a market far wider than the obvious regional one.

Pub Date: March 15, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Crowell

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966