Robert Hunter is a sort of cleanybopper for the brave new world which he claims is either acomin' or already arrived. It...

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THE ENEMIES OF ANARCHY: A Gestalt Approach to Change

Robert Hunter is a sort of cleanybopper for the brave new world which he claims is either acomin' or already arrived. It depends on which chapter you're into. Be that as it may (let's not get involved in minutiae -- this book handles the big, panting issues, baby), the ""post-civilized"" world (Ken Boulding's phrase) will ""involve controls over our existence which are more pervasive than those that have existed in any earlier culture."" Worried? Don't be, because, dig this -- ""the nature of the controls and the way in which they will function will free us -- and free us not only from economic slavery, but from ideological, cultural, and emotional slavery as well."" You get the beat. It's Skinnerian. Cooperation, meekness, humility, Walden Two drippiness are extolled -- Hunter calls it ""large-scale integration"" (a ""package description"" or ""handle"") for want of anything difficult or precise. The point is, when all our anarchic impulses are said and done, ""The aggressive, domineering personality must reshape itself""; nothing less than ""A reversal of our basic premises, behavior, and methodology is necessary at this stage if we are to survive."" The rest waffles through McLuhan, Galbraith, Boulding, Ehrlich (whose Population Bomb is quoted with favor!), Riesman, Fromm, Ellul, Existentialism (""an abyss"" though ""its essence is emerging as the line which separates the global village from the universal concentration camp""), Mailer, and, God knows, all the other middleweights you can think of. Hunter's heart is in the right place. It's his head we're concerned about.

Pub Date: July 20, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1973