This is the second volume of The Layman's Theological Library Series. In it the author sets forth with wit and wisdom the...

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THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE CHURCH

This is the second volume of The Layman's Theological Library Series. In it the author sets forth with wit and wisdom the heritage, genius, and promise of the Protestant Church. This he does by a fresh exposition of the nature of the church as it is described in the New Testament, a vigorous, life-giving fellowship of believers for whom God is the source of all creative life because He is the true and only center of their common worship. Modern Protestants, he reminds his readers, have dissipated their rich inheritance too often by a ""low"" conception of the church and the demands Christ makes through his church for faithful obedience and witness. Partial allegiances to some phase of the whole truth has too often led to denominational rivalry which hinders the full work of the church. ""Denominations,"" he says, ""are not necessarily the work of the devil. But where a denomination assumes that it alone has the final Christian truth, there the cloven hoof is near and the air is full of sulphur."" His wit is often ""witty"", as when he says, in commenting on some of the strong and vigorous Reformation music, which was nothing less than a reflection in human terms of the Lord God Almighty, that ""they are a welcome contrast to 19th century chromatic fantasies and gospel jazz hymns. Praising God in three-quarter time is one of the most difficult of spiritual exercises."" Many laymen should read this book to their great profit.

Pub Date: April 23, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Westminster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1956