People of African descent throughout the globe constitute/1973 a common cultural and political community by virtue of...

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PAN-AFRICANISM

People of African descent throughout the globe constitute/1973 a common cultural and political community by virtue of origins in Africa and common racial, social and economic oppression,"" claims Robert Chrisman -- W. E. B. DuBois was the true father of Pan-Africanism, Marcus Garvey showed its mass potential, Nkrumah became its continental dean, and in the U.S. Stokely Carmichael and LeRoi Jones have been its most vigorous proselytizers. No essays by DuBois or Garvey are included here, though Garvey is dissected somewhat inconclusively by Tiki Sundiata and Milfred C. Fierce. The book has two themes: the rape of people of African descent and the cultural glories of ancient and future Africa. Separation and ""self-help"" are advocated for Africans and blacks in other parts of the world. Those contributors who dwell on culture include DuBois' widow Shirley; Sekou Toure of Guinea finds that ""culture implies our struggle. . . against any kind of domination""; Eldridge Cleaver, Adolph Reed, Jr., Max Stanford, Earl Anthony, and Jones, agree that ""culture"" binds all black men together beyond the European notions of Marx. Ujama or nation-building is expounded by Carmichael and President Nyrere of Tanzania. It involves communal cooperatives, obligation to the nation-family and self-sacrifice, as Joyce Ladner shows in her more down-to-earth description of Tanzanian women's hard physical labor. Otherwise, the actual practice of Ujama or Pan-Africanism remains hazy; Jones, for one, gives no inkling of what his NewArk (sic) organization does from day to day. Most of the essays date from the last upsurge of black nationalism; its present ebb casts doubt on the editors' belief in a ""renaissance,"" but those who want to check out that era will get a sufficient sampling here.

Pub Date: Jan. 29, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973