Do you remember Bogart and Gable and ""Coop"" and ""Spence"" and all those other golden idols of the silver screen before...

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THE SOUNDS OF DRUMS AND CYMBALS

Do you remember Bogart and Gable and ""Coop"" and ""Spence"" and all those other golden idols of the silver screen before they headed into the ""gunmetal twilight?"" Wilder does, in a novel which doesn't amount to much more than the curriculum vitae of the industry with its barely-there plot and walk-on characters. Among them Deke Kinkaid, Academy Award director who comes back to the Hollywood that was at the end of World War II to resume a not altogether satisfactory marriage to Midge and working relationship with her father, a mogul who goes by his monogram L.B.L.B.'s wife leaves him after an affair she considers unworthy of them both; he dies of a heart attack; Deke takes over and then faces the attrition of the motion picture world as well as the competition of his own son who sells the studio from under him. . . . Schlockmeister Wilder has held his audience through the years on the basis of the commercial hedonism of novels that moved; this one doesn't and in spite of Wilder's assiduous name-dropping, it's hard to summon up the glamor of a premiere at Grauman's Chinese when the writing's as lifeless as Forest Lawn.

Pub Date: Jan. 2, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973