Kremlinologists and Sinologists are doctors wearing blinders whose patients rest under sheets in a darkened room. This time...

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SOVIET AND CHINESE COMMUNIST POWER IN THE WORLD TODAY

Kremlinologists and Sinologists are doctors wearing blinders whose patients rest under sheets in a darkened room. This time four academics and a journalist give the prognosis. Max Frankel of the New York Times leads off with a believable argument for a Communist world shifting to a more liberal attitude. His conclusion is hedged on only slightly by Philip E. Mosely, Director of Columbia's European Institute. Most commonplace and least stimulating is the middle piece by George E. Taylor, who seems to have viewed China through fogs and typhoons from his vantage point at the University of Washington. By contrast, Dr. Marshall Shulman of Harvard contributes a brilliant and provocative essay on the future of a United States-Russia detente. Editor Swearingen, in a good, interesting appraisal of the Sino-Soviet dispute, rounds out the volume. The good doctors triumph despite handicaps. Recommended.

Pub Date: Nov. 25, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Basic Books

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966