A history which, with its moments of soft and not too insistent plaintiveness, will have its appeal both to those with a...

READ REVIEW

A SHORT HISTORY OF IRELAND

A history which, with its moments of soft and not too insistent plaintiveness, will have its appeal both to those with a general interest in the land and to people who feel that Ireland is ever the land of the Gaels. M. Chauvire, a Frenchman and a professor at the National University of Ireland, calls attention in his introduction to the vague and pleasant sadness of the Irish temper, in which the voice of Gaeldom is still to be heard. Whether one agrees with this predominant view or not, its implementation is convincing and joins the Irish past with the Irish present through a strongly linked chain of situational analyses- of the pastoral land, of the Gaelic migrations and legendary kings, of the beginnings of Christianity and the golden age it fostered, of the Norman Conquest and of the death struggle that brought Ireland under the thumb of English rule in the 17th and 18th centuries. Nor was England to be squelched in the 19th. Within the national limits and influenced by such forces as the famine and the American Civil War there are the rises and failures of such men as O'Connell and Parsell. The movements and reforms they sponsored are clarified in detail and individuality. In its brevity an admittedly incomplete view, but as a short history admirably adequate.

Pub Date: Oct. 30, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Devin-Adair

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1956