Mutual advantage effects a peace between traditional enemies--when a blind old tiger lies dying because he can't hunt and...

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OLD TIGER, NEW TIGER

Mutual advantage effects a peace between traditional enemies--when a blind old tiger lies dying because he can't hunt and Wise Monkey feeds him fruit to keep him alive on the theory that the tiger's presence will keep other, more dangerous tigers away. And when a challenger does appear, Wise Monkey acts as the old tiger's eyes, enabling him to bluff the other tiger away. Roy's telling of the unexceptional tale lacks luster, as the ending indicates: ""'That is a good plan,' said the blind tiger. 'You are kind to let me use your eyes.' 'Eyes alone cannot keep hungry tigers away,' said Wise Monkey. 'Thank you for letting us use your body.'"" And Bargielski's dull two-color pictures have no muscle.

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1978

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Abingdon

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1978