Following the pattern of his other biographies for this age group (see John Smith of Virginia, 1954- P. 63), Ronald Syme's...

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HENRY HUDSON

Following the pattern of his other biographies for this age group (see John Smith of Virginia, 1954- P. 63), Ronald Syme's spare and hardy prose again contributes a facet of the exploration of America. Hudson was brought up along London's waterfront, and from boyhood knew he did not want to go into trade. He took to his natural love, the sea, at an early age, probably sailed against the Armada, but was a married man before he could persuade the Company of Merchant Adventurers to outfit him for Greenland and Russian expeditions, in search of the ellusive passage to the Orient. Later a trip financed by the Dutch took him up the river which bears his name and to the great inland bay, now known as Hudson's Bay. His success was not realized in his time, and a succession of conflicts with his men led to his mortal betrayal. All of this checkered career, and the feel of the young new world, are fully realized in Syme's narrative.

Pub Date: Feb. 16, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1954