An invaluable handbook for women (and men) contemplating a political career, and for the legions of readers interested in...

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MOMENTUM: Women in American Politics Now

An invaluable handbook for women (and men) contemplating a political career, and for the legions of readers interested in the political process. Romney (Republican National Committeewoman/Mich.) and Harrison, co-authors of Giving Time a Chance (1986), interviewed dozens of political women who here reveal how they got into politics, funded and ran campaigns, and--as office-holders or working for one--handled their responsibilities. They all agree that politics is a rough, high-pressure game, and that men are still uncomfortable with cohorts in skirts; but it was once much worse. As recently as 1981, Elizabeth Holtzman's opponent for the office of Brooklyn D.A. ran radio ads that intoned: ""She's a nice girl; I might even like her for a daughter, but not as D.A."" Everyone seems to agree that Geraldine Ferraro's performance in her v-p bid has made male politicians take women more seriously. But women face real disadvantages: fund-raising is horrendous, and women seldom have pipelines to the rich and powerful. Unlike men, women must waste precious hours in hair salons and pop in and out of strange restrooms to change outfits and freshen makeup as they move from plant tours to cocktail parties. They usually don't abandon family responsibilities when campaigning, and must endure considerable frivolous or snide media attention. The political wasteland is littered with competent women who simply ""burned out,"" but their accomplishments, say Romney and Harrison, have paved the way for a constantly swelling pool of skilled corporate and professional women who will break the male stranglehold on political power. Crammed with pertinent anecdotes and solid info, crisply written, consistently interesting.

Pub Date: March 1, 1988

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Crown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 15, 1988