The grace, the fragility, associated with Rumer Godden, again most evident in this new book which is not a story (and...

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THE RIVER

The grace, the fragility, associated with Rumer Godden, again most evident in this new book which is not a story (and therefore less probably popular), but rather an interlude, a pause in time as well as a play on time, in the early adolescence of a young girl. This concerns Harriet, one of several children in an English family in India, Harriet who has reached the frightening, questioning borderline between adolescence and maturity. Here are her thoughts about living and dying, about the world, about change as her older sister withdraws to an adult sphere, her little brother is killed by a cobra. Omnipresent is the sense of the irrevocability of time when ""nothing stops days, or rivers"", adding a metaphysical tone to the idyll. Frail, fugitive, this may be too tenuous for may tastes- even though she has a following.

Pub Date: Sept. 11, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1946