She wore her black hair swept to one side, adding a piquancy to the severity of her features, and for the first time in his...

READ REVIEW

RHEA

She wore her black hair swept to one side, adding a piquancy to the severity of her features, and for the first time in his life Phillip found himself wishing that a woman were wearing less. . . ."" Poor Phillip! Nearly 40 and for the first time in his life wishing a woman were wearing less. And awfully strange, since we soon learn that Phillip, head of a movie studio's story department, is a great philanderer. This kind of inconsistency betrays the amateur hand of first-novelist Martin, a teacher of film aesthetics in California. His murky demonology here balances three time schemes simultaneously. Young Rhea, back in Revolutionary times, is a child prodigy who finds a book on demonic spells and summons up the servants of the devil when she is only five or so. We follow her demonically extended life of domineering evil for about 200 years. Also, we're following the more contemporary story of Phillip's youth, when he steals his roomie's screenplay, rewrites it with his own ideas, and wins a slot in the Big Studio. And we're also in the present, when Rhea has started to seduce Philipp--his wife goes to a medium, finds out about his philandering, and leaves him. Before it's over she copulates with the Devil himself (who has a cold, two-headed penis), and she dies. Lucky lady. Phillip and Rhea, however, are doomed to each other's company--which should be avoided at all costs.

Pub Date: Dec. 1, 1978

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Ermine--dist. by Whirlwind Book Co. (80 Fifth Ave., NYC 10011)

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1978