This long-suffering novel, plagued by the reminder of Freud's very own ""Analysis. . . interminable,"" defies a really...

READ REVIEW

THE ULTIMATE TRIUMPH

This long-suffering novel, plagued by the reminder of Freud's very own ""Analysis. . . interminable,"" defies a really ""conflict-free statement"" as to whether it's more soap opera than soap box. During its 400 pages Dan Gunther follows in the footsteps of ""The Master"" as he appears here in his last years (there are other real figures also -- Meyers, Harry Stack Sullivan) and after Dan goes to Vienna to study with his recently acquired Jenny whom he neglects throughout. In time Dan and Jenny return to the States -- Dan to give up his own analysis reluctantly in order to become an intern in a New York state mental facility while Jenny has one child and then another. But there's also the death of a young female patient in his silk robe to promote doubt, for Dan is inclined to scant their relationship not just to get ahead. He is also searching for ""the ultimate triumph"" over his father via a rival -- his and Jenny's closest friend, George. We can assume that this is accomplished on the final page when Dan and George deliver her third child in unison. . . . One can put up with all the earnest overexplaining -- it's that reverential smarm. . . .

Pub Date: Jan. 11, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973