Interesting from angle of being a regional novel using a background that is largely unfamiliar. The Pennsylvania Dutch of...

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STRAW IN THE WIND

Interesting from angle of being a regional novel using a background that is largely unfamiliar. The Pennsylvania Dutch of Helen Martin's stories are the obvious comparison, and in this connection Straw In The Wind seems a bit machine-made and lacking in the vital human spark. But the Amish communities are scarcely touched upon, and this gives a definite Americana interest to the book. The central character is a tyrant who rules by fear, not only his cowed family, but the neighbors and the congregation, of which he is leader. He withers the very souls of those he comes in contact with -- and eventually is destroyed by his own son's rebellion. Check sales on Eleanor Blake's Seedtime and Harvest (Putnam) and Sun On Their Shoulders by Elizabeth Eastman (Morrow) -- both comparable in quality and market appeal, and all three. I fear, limited in sales value. The fact that this novel won the Avery Hopwood and Jule Hopwood Prize for 1930 may give it a certain impetus. It certainly deserves recognition, as above average.

Pub Date: Jan. 20, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dodd, Mead

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1937