Certainly Ruth Prawer Jhavbala is a taste to be acquired or rather to have been acquired through the years that she has been...

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Certainly Ruth Prawer Jhavbala is a taste to be acquired or rather to have been acquired through the years that she has been writing her peculiarly stylized novels of the India (that was) which attract modifiers such as ""deft"" or ""decorous"" or comparisons (repeatedly) to Jane Austen. All under chapter headings such as ""Asha Opens Her Heart"" or ""Gopi is Displeased"" or ""Raymond Plans a Nice Ending"" wherein little dialogues in the present tense take place. Primarily between Asia (who hates India really) and Gopi whom she loves and marries and Raymond who was Gopi's very good British friend until they find that ""life [is] sweeping them apart."" In between there are endless small exchanges -- they eat kebabs, go to the ashram, sip tea and one cannot exclude the fact that another portrait of India has been faintly achieved via the cultivated artlessness. Also that someone has watered the tea.

Pub Date: June 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1973