Though less of a novel than a string of anecdotes, this semi-autobiographical story of a Western childhood is tremendously...

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LITTLE WORLD APART

Though less of a novel than a string of anecdotes, this semi-autobiographical story of a Western childhood is tremendously refreshing and absorbing. The dialogue often has the liveliness of a ringtailed bobcat and about half the stories involve hunting deer, bear and mountain lion. Jeff Boron, 14, lives with his slightly older brother Chad, their parents and two sisters in a log cabin in New Mexico. It is 1914 or thereabouts. The Bohannons have a small farm and a herd of sixty head. Even so, they are rather poor mountain people, although Mr. Bohannon branches out and opens a not very profitable sawmill. We follow the Bohannons on a round-up; to Sunday go to meeting; to a big picnic; have Christmas with them; and watch the courtship and wedding of daughter Kathaleen, and such homely activities. The hunting scenes have occasional moments of danger, but are more about the texture of a hunt than about fierce beasts and towering grizzlies. The Bohannons literally are a little world apart; not one telephone or automobile is mentioned in the book and, though one girl marries and Chad goes off to fight the Germans, we last see the family still in its log cabin. The Bohannons are not drawn with any great depth or subtlety, but their world of experience will stimulate all five senses.

Pub Date: March 18, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966