Further experiences in this naturalist's life take on a more sociological for here she writes about the Eskimos-and Alaska...

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MOONLIGHT AT MIDDAY

Further experiences in this naturalist's life take on a more sociological for here she writes about the Eskimos-and Alaska as a some. In her pursuit of wild life observation she makes Unalakleet, a village of 400, her base and there gets to know and share the round of activities, the work and play, the customs and legends of her neighbors -- and finds them ""a fine, complete people"". She tells of their language, their family life, their medicine men, of the conflicts that modern times have imposed on them, of the status of women and the bringing up of the children, and of their admirable qualities, and, with this really rugged kind of life behind her, she is able to make her decision to live permanently in the North. At Nome and Fairbanks she takes on the problems of housing, equipment, food, and considers the possibilities and advantages of today's ""pioneering"" there. An informative and lively book this displays a warm, personal interest in people and the place where ""the rest of the world is a long way off"", and should recommend itself to readers of her earlier March, (1947), Icebound Summer (1953) etc.

Pub Date: Oct. 20, 1958

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1958