This is a serious if not altogether credible attempt to recreate the possible life of one of those few young Americans who...

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PORCUPINE-MAN

This is a serious if not altogether credible attempt to recreate the possible life of one of those few young Americans who chose to stay on with their captors following the Korean War truce. ""Stork"" Collier, former freshman star linebacker from the U. of West Virginia, drops out to join the United Nations forces fighting aggression in North Korea, where he is fairly promptly captured and handed over to the Chinese for ""thought remolding,"" which includes, among other things, isolation, reading, discussions with other Americans and a Captain Gao of the People's Volunteer Army, and some back-breaking physical labor. Several corn and spinach crops later, he goes with Gao to his tiny village where he assists with collectivization and modernization, until, somehow or other, the sight of an impending electrical tower signals him that it is time to go home, though, as any young college-educated American should know, you can't go home again. This is an odd, interesting, if not entirely successful novel.

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Saturday Press Review -- dist. by Dutton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973