A novel of love and laughter, with undercurrents of pathos, in the story of a group of Americans, caught in the mesh of...

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THE BUSY BUSY PEOPLE

A novel of love and laughter, with undercurrents of pathos, in the story of a group of Americans, caught in the mesh of Embassy life in Moscow during the war, victims of the run-around, boredom and inactivity which resulted in their devoting themselves to the unimportant things to keep busy. A can of peaches disappears from the storeroom, with Lt. Col. Hoag, a realtor who has found a way to make a fortune in Moscow, hot on its trail; there's a feud between G2 and S.O.S.; there's the breakup between young Saunders and his Russian wife; there's Pop Thomas, an American newspaperman, who is trying to write a monument about the Revolution, and young Renwick, an embassy secretary, who takes the job over after his death; there's death and imprisonment and vilification and frustration in a competent, well-written novel, which shows the dramatic ability of its author. There are no political implications, except those conveyed, tongue in cheek.

Pub Date: Oct. 26, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Houghton, Mifflin

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1948