It almost reads like a tract for the shape-up Eighties--as against the do-you-own-thing era just past. But youngsters will...

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CROSSING OVER

It almost reads like a tract for the shape-up Eighties--as against the do-you-own-thing era just past. But youngsters will surely sympathize with 13-year-old Megan when she and brother Kevin, ten, find themselves at Kentucky Military Academy, where their divorced father is teaching, instead of their accustomed ""progressive"" school: their mother, off to study nursing, has agreed that artistic Megan needs to bring up her academic standing. And by bending to the rigid ways of KMA, she does--with encouragement from an art teacher who's also a misfit there and the companionship of another girl who's also a bit of a rebel. As for the children's preoccupied, curt father--well, he too is using KMA for his own purposes: to launch a career, ultimately, as a summer-camp owner. Call it enlightened opportunism, maybe, but it does have its fictional points.

Pub Date: Sept. 15, 1981

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1981