For those who think that Portuguese cuisine consists of a hundred and one recipes for cod, Krieg will be a revelation. He...

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WHAT'S COOKING IN PORTUGAL

For those who think that Portuguese cuisine consists of a hundred and one recipes for cod, Krieg will be a revelation. He begins with a discussion of the more authentic regional dishes including something called papas de sarrabulho made frm the blood of hogs -- which, fortunately, you're not expected to duplicate. Then an informative run-down of local wines, brandies and Madeiras. Portuguese taste combinations are unusual -- shrimp porto, an appetizer, is prepared with oranges, pineapples and grapes -- and pork, the most abundant and popular meat, is frequently combined with shellfish. Portugal's famous sardines are ubiquitous: sauced, fried in a beer batter. pounded into croquettes seasoned with coriander and oregano, secreted in salads and even dumplings. The rich, thick fish soups are a marvel though the cost might be prohibitive. Several recipes for rabbit are included since game is much favored, but seafood is the main attraction -- dried, salted cod certainly, but also clams and cockles and the local lobster brandied and ignited and spooned over seasoned rice. For the adventurous there are several recipes for eel -- broiled, barbecued or stewed. And for dessert, ran, the smooth rich caramel custard in several versions. The next best thing to a vacation in Lisbon -- and Krieg includes a list of recommended restaurants.

Pub Date: May 23, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1974