This is the fourth volume of autobiography to appear from the pen of the well-known playwright and erstwhile Irish...

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INNISFALLEN, FARE THEE WELL

This is the fourth volume of autobiography to appear from the pen of the well-known playwright and erstwhile Irish Republican, Sean O'Casey. Like the others, it is a moving and marvelously well-written story of the last phases of the fight for freedom, and like that episode in history, it ends in irony and disillusion. Beginning with the terrible period of the Black and Tans in Ireland, going on to the actual creation of the Irish Free State,- telling with mordant disgust and horror of the Irish Civil War, which followed the first taste of freedom from Britain's rule in a thousand years,- he ends in the last half on purely personal and literary notes. O'Casey moved to the once hated England, where he feels that nothing worse than what has already happened can happen again. He lives now in London, married, and an honored playwright, he is almost blind from the disease, poverty and battle of his Dublin youth. But one feels that his revolutionary spirit carries on. Perhaps Ireland's heroic, romantic and often absurd struggle has been submerged in the titanic world tidal wave. But for those who remember nostalgically the days of the Irish movement, and for those who honor O'Casey for his rare literary gift, his sparkling pen portraits, his bits alike of honest appreciation and distaste, this book is memorable reading.

Pub Date: Feb. 21, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1948