This starts to be one of those stories about a little old house hemmed in by skyscrapers--and winds up as the story of a...

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MRS. TORTINO'S RETURN TO THE SUN

This starts to be one of those stories about a little old house hemmed in by skyscrapers--and winds up as the story of a little old house on top of a skyscraper on the very same spot. Mrs. Tortino's Victorian relic, and the contents of her garden (planted in pots), are hoisted up, you see, floor by floor--preserving intact the ""old family home that her mother had lived in, and her mother before her, and her mother before her."" But seeing isn't believing, and wishing won't make it so: the decline-and-resurrection of Virginia Lee Burton's Little House is a marvel of realism compared to this. And charming as the thought of a Victorian pile-in-the-sky may be, the authors close off the fanciful aspects of the situation by focusing almost entirely on the impossible-to-execute lift-operation. (The pictures are marginally effective, though they run to waggish nostalgia too.)

Pub Date: Feb. 18, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Lothrop, Lee & Shepard

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1980