The author's books about the American Indians are excellent, and her new series on African tribes (the first two were The...

READ REVIEW

THE ASHANTI OF GHANA

The author's books about the American Indians are excellent, and her new series on African tribes (the first two were The Masai, 1963 and The Tuareg) is matching them in calibre. The Ashanti, now the major population group in Ghana, were once the dominant and most powerful tribal organization in West Africa. This is a very detailed description of them,--their elaborate customs, beliefs, and rituals, their handiwork, their society, and their history before and after the coming of the Europeans and in contemporary Ghana. And, it is told in surprising depth, but in simple language and pared of anthropological jargon. The book does complete justice to the Ashanti way of life, which is in many ways quite sophisticated, and in the final chapter shows how tribal custom reacts to modern statehood. Readers will stay interested and informed all the way through.

Pub Date: April 6, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1966