With comparatively few exceptions, most of the evidence supporting Miss Margold's position dates back several years, which...

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LET'S DO BUSINESS WITH RUSSIA

With comparatively few exceptions, most of the evidence supporting Miss Margold's position dates back several years, which considerably weakens the value of her argument that we should do business with Russia. But- for the industrialist, the business man, seeking the whys and hows, here is the essential data of procedure. Trade must be sought- but the needs are there, and the record is good, and the outcome can mean economic prosperity. Consideration is given to the factors that interfere. Trade agreements and contracts, in various forms, are considered. Miss Margold (presumably reflecting the Dept. of Commerce) advises appointment of a representative who knows the language and has an official title; she gives the data on securing of visas, on costs, and so on. She analyzes procedure; lists agencies on preliminaries; suggests importance of direct contact with factories; stresses importance of advertising, promotion, trademarks; poses the problems of patent rights; advises cooperation in exhibits; discusses the necessity of dealing with Amtorg. These preliminaries dealt with, she goes on to the interview, the questions of loans and advances, the tax laws, the guaranteed profit system, the provisions for arbitration. She shows the procedure followed by Germany before the war, by Britain- both of whom had gone farther than we have gone. And she summarizes certain agreements since World War II. In closing, she argues the case for an American loan. Useful-not conclusive.

Pub Date: Nov. 24, 1948

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1948