Stella Zilliacus grew up in the liberal, polyglot sphere of the League of Nations to move around the world- and it is this...

READ REVIEW

SIX PEOPLE AND LOVE

Stella Zilliacus grew up in the liberal, polyglot sphere of the League of Nations to move around the world- and it is this which gives a particular identity, and in a sense a unity (these episodes are told in the first person) to the six stories here. While in no sense a novel, the world which is reflected is an animated one- full of interesting ideas- and people- and occasionally spattered with famous figures- Shaw and Nehru, for example. And the six romantic incidents, in the hands of their sympathetic interpreter, bring the larger issues of class, nationality, political ideology, down to personal terms: a cousin is married off to a titled White Russian rather than the Englishman of her choice; her father's oldest friend, a ""woolly idealist"", is less admirable when his daughter's happiness is involved; the uncomfortable situation of the pregnancy of a girl of an old English family is handled by her aristocratic grandmother; Teresa, in the Warsaw of 1947, gives up the man she loves for the sake of her family- only to find that the security she has brought is a precarious thing at best; etc. etc. In all of them, Miss Ziliacus travels easily through many countries- many situations- and she writes amusingly and pleasingly about them.

Pub Date: April 22, 1957

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: John Day

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1957