Another dollhouse door is slammed when Tansy Warner's full-time, spic-and-span mother leaves her rigid lawyer husband and...

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THE LIBERATION OF TANSY WARNER

Another dollhouse door is slammed when Tansy Warner's full-time, spic-and-span mother leaves her rigid lawyer husband and three teenage children with nothing but a short, clueless note. Tansy, the youngest, has her role as Anne Frank in the upcoming school play to sustain her, a close friend to help with practicalities, and a nice boy in the cast, who is understanding despite his girlfriend's displeasure. It is Tansy who gets the household chores organized when her bossy older sister fails, and it is Tansy who traces their mother through the phone bill and visits her small, cockroach-infested apartment in Chicago--where the former Mrs. Warner has taken up her real thing, macramÉ. The visit is shattering for Tansy, but it also helps her to take hold of her own developing sense of self, and to come to terms with her father's lifelong indifference. Tolan handles Tansy's shock and her ensuing ""liberation"" credibly and sympathetically, but this drabber story hasn't the currents of The Last of Eden (p. 213, J-55).

Pub Date: April 28, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Scribners

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1980