Stresses in the Peaceable Kingdom sums it all up very well. After a reading of Stephen Sandy's first collection of nearly...

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STRESSES IN THE PEACEABLE KINGDOM

Stresses in the Peaceable Kingdom sums it all up very well. After a reading of Stephen Sandy's first collection of nearly fifty poems you can refer to its title and to his title poem and agree that, just as he says, there are a lot of stresses in our Kingdom; there's lost childhood to contend with and ""the cold of a mortal season"" and Hiawatha (is dead) has been waylaid by ""the whole bag of pitiable tricks."" ""A death, a truth, a childhood of us (is) gone."" Also, ""The nuts fall, and schoolboys have marked the tree their own, and are on hand to bag the crop to the last sweet nut, if squirrels do not thwart them."" His poems (laments) manage to escape sentimentality and he seems to have come to terms with all thwarting elements, such as squirrels and human waste. The past and present eclipse each other in turn. The ""energy unleashed upon, informing the waste world"" in Adam and in atoms, is real. Sandy isn't an introspective, personal poet and he seems to be outside a lot of the time, inspecting and excavating and surveying his Kingdom. He brings The Woolworth Philodendrum home with him. For a long while ""through grillings by the daily sun it never broke its dime-store trance,"" but very gradually, ""a careless wildness, long-leaved and green, mesh with dark plots implicit in the sun."" A very respectable first volume.

Pub Date: March 30, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966