This is an appropriate new entry in the Modern Masters series, for whatever we may think ""modernism"" means, its essence is...

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T. S. ELIOT

This is an appropriate new entry in the Modern Masters series, for whatever we may think ""modernism"" means, its essence is surely crystallized in Fliot's works. Just to mention The Hollow Men, Ash Wednesday, The Cocktail Party is to suggest the touchstone of a particular culture. Yet Eliot is more than the voice of a generation: his haunting, innovative, exacting lines are also those of a man speaking intensely to himself, of himself, grappling in a private universe full of puzzling obsessions and mocking terrors. This master of the ""objective correlative"" is, as Randall Jarrell says, ""one of the most subjective and daemonic poets who ever lived."" Such a poet is perforce difficult to interpret, but he has been shrewdly and delicately served in an important new study by Stephen Spender, echo splendidly captures Eliot's stages of development in their proper moral and historical climates. A fellow-poet's insight and care are apparent on every page.

Pub Date: March 1, 1976

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1976