This collection of early black nationalist thought in the form of speeches, articles and letters has little coherence except...

READ REVIEW

THE IDEOLOGICAL ORIGINS OF BLACK NATIONALISM

This collection of early black nationalist thought in the form of speeches, articles and letters has little coherence except for the preponderant theme of black against white. The material, familiar to any student of black movements, starts with the oracular Ethiopian Manifesto by Robert Alexander Young, which prophesies an Ethiopian messiah ordained by God, and includes Henry Garnet's famous ""Address to the Slaves"" and Martin Delany's ""Political Destiny"" as further high points. Early black nationalists may be forgiven if, in their struggle for emancipation, they drew on myths of an ideal Africa that never existed or if they saw emigration and black ""nation-building"" as panaceas, but Stuckey pumps each fiction and frail scheme full of ponderous importance. Aside from marginal primary-source utility, this has little redeeming value.

Pub Date: Nov. 13, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Beacon

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1972