Sumner Locke Elliott is one of the few men to write novels which are unmistakably feminine in character and contemporary...

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GOING, GOING

Sumner Locke Elliott is one of the few men to write novels which are unmistakably feminine in character and contemporary without being truly modern. There is, particularly here, a ""dear boy"" gentility and a sort of upper social class consciousness where one often says the right things for the wrong reasons. This one actually takes place in the future where there are euthanasia draft numbers to take care of everyone who reaches 65 and Tess Bracken has reached the going, going day so that her whole life now passes in review: her marriage to Elton who had anticipated the forced exit by committing suicide; her two daughters (one drab, subjected to a lobotomy; the other unpleasant and married to the insensitive, self-made Harry -- now adviser to the president); her oldest friend in a ""Biding"" home; and finally the homosexual Canadian photographer who offers her a passage to safety in his country at the price of her real life. As it was, as it was, for the people who liked it that way (referrals to the Women's Exchange and the Ladies' Home Companion and the Russian Tearoom) with a not so nice notion for the day after tomorrow.

Pub Date: Jan. 15, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1974