For those who like their dumplings and their paprika, Mrs. Derecskey's fond tour of Transylvania cookery will be welcome....

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THE HUNGARIAN COOKBOOK

For those who like their dumplings and their paprika, Mrs. Derecskey's fond tour of Transylvania cookery will be welcome. But make no mistake: from the meat and cabbage soups to the sour cream-thickened sauces and the potato pancakes and noodle puddings, the food is rich and heavy. Like most East European cuisines the Hungarian diet includes a great deal of starch principally in the form of galushka, the soft dumplings which garnish chicken and goulash dishes with potatoes and barley also prominently featured. Organ meats are another staple of peasant cooking and housewives looking for cheap sirloin substitutes might try her suggestions for veal kidneys in mustard sauce, sauted brains, and jellied pork made with the ear, tail and jowl of that versatile animal. Most of the dishes turn out to be surprisingly elegant despite the weight, especially when finished off by the renowned Hungarian strudel (the dough must be ""kneaded aggressively and stretched lovingly"") and a glass of tokay, the legendary Hungarian dessert wine Mephisto offered Faust.

Pub Date: Nov. 5, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1972