These essays, originally delivered as papers at a symposium, have, as their overall purpose, to ask questions rather than to...

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THE WORD IN HISTORY

These essays, originally delivered as papers at a symposium, have, as their overall purpose, to ask questions rather than to provide answers. The basic question is: What are the principal theological problems facing the Church today? The contributors each examine, according to their specialties, some phase of that question from either the Protestant or Catholic viewpoints: Karl Rahner on theology and anthropology; Henri de Lubac on grace; Schillebeeckx on faith; Joseph Sittler on the problems of modern Protestant theology; Jean Danielou on Christianity and the non-Christian religions; George Lindbeck on the bases of Catholic-Protestant disagreement; Alexander Schmemann on freedom in the Church; Yves Congar on institutionalized religion; and Charles Davis on the Eucharist. The book suffers, of course, the disabilities of all such collections, particularly the almost unavoidable unevenness of style, approach, and disparity of frames of reference. The eminence of the contributors, however, and the generally high quality of the individual chapters, make The Word in History, unlike most such collections, well worth the reading.

Pub Date: Nov. 9, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Sheed & Ward

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966