...was the third and last governess for the author and her brother, Nick. She came to St. Petersburg in Tasha's sixth year...

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OUR MISS WILLIAMS

...was the third and last governess for the author and her brother, Nick. She came to St. Petersburg in Tasha's sixth year to succeed Fraulein Katterfeldt who was dismissed because she was too interested in soldiers. Tasha and Nick didn't care for the Fraulein for many reasons, chiefly because while in her care they had to accompany her on her assignations with Boris. But Miss Williams was quite different -- a plain woman, prim and proper, an Englishwoman who saw that her duty was to anglicize her young charges. She introduced them to porridge, icy cold morning baths and British sailor suits. She accompanied them and their countess mother to Yalta to visit their grandfather and his third wife -- a woman who was not much taken with things British, including the energetic Miss Williams. When the 1917 Russian Revolution broke out, Miss Williams reluctantly left for England. And the countess and her family, because they were, of course, on the wrong side, soon had to assemble their few belongings, leave the country and deviously make their way to Malta, then to London where the children were happily reunited with their Miss Williams. A pleasant, harmless story.

Pub Date: Feb. 24, 1957

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dodd, Mead

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1957