As beguilingly happy and fast-paced as those romantic comedies of the '30's and early '4O's -- before Bob and Carol and Ted...

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LUNATICS AND LOVERS: A Tribute to the Giddy and Glittering Era of the Screen's ""Screwball"" and Romantic Comedies

As beguilingly happy and fast-paced as those romantic comedies of the '30's and early '4O's -- before Bob and Carol and Ted and Alice moved into the neighborhood -- when life seemed possible and fresh again to a country recently Depressed and the entertainment at the art deco palace down the block was something to look forward to all week. The plots were undeniably formula (like glue the studios stuck with a good thing: five sequels for The Thin Man, three for Topper): poor girl/boy by luck/pluck/gall marries millionaire (Ginger Rogers in Fifth Avenue Girl: ""I've got my claws in plush and I like the feel of it""), the idle rich humanized by contact with the earnest poor; the tough successful career woman finds real happiness in marriage (as often as not to a garage mechanic) -- the dialogue full of bright banter and airy nonsense delivered with grace and style by ensemble acting that died off with the studio system. Myrna Loy and William Powell, Fred and Ginger, Kate and Spence, amiable bumbling Robert Benchley, wisecracking Joan Blondell, fussy, prissy Edward Everett Horton, and their sidekicks Eric Blore, Mary Boland, Charlie Ruggles, Alan Mowbray even on 40 year-old celluloid they're still an event.

Pub Date: Jan. 3, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Arlington House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973