Terry Carr brings together some perennial sci fi fantasies which manage to cover most of the favorite phobias nursed by...

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INTO THE UNKNOWN: Eleven Tales of the Imagination

Terry Carr brings together some perennial sci fi fantasies which manage to cover most of the favorite phobias nursed by writers who make their imaginations work overtime for a living. In between Ray Bradbury's ""McGillahee's Brat,"" which once again expresses his deep mistrust of babies, and James Gunn's paranoia about ""The Old Folks,"" we meet a gossipy mongrel, the ""Dogman of Islington,"" the fear of pain and death in Vance Aandahl's ""Beyond the Game,"" the dangers of contentment in Carr's own ""Touchstone,"" and finally that very modem fear of fading into the woodwork so well done in Harlan Ellison's ""Are You Listening."" The metaphysical stolidity of Ballard's ""Drowned Giant"" and Borges' bemused soliloquy on the permutations of ""The Lottery in Babylon"" add a little stretch to an otherwise agreeably fathomable collection. The only thing you have to fear is that you've already read them.

Pub Date: Sept. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Nelson

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1973