A Look reporter assigned to cover Project India 1955, Tom Morgan covered both the U.C.L.A. team that went out and the...

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A Look reporter assigned to cover Project India 1955, Tom Morgan covered both the U.C.L.A. team that went out and the response they met. He traveled with half the group devoted to a massive approach on the India college campuses on the Malabar Coast and in South India -- and watched the serious, hard-working troubadours go through their carefully prepared routines. Shifting to the Calcutta crew, he found a different group at work in a different way, approaching Indian students on a long-term, many-meeting basis. The campus meetings, sessions in the India Coffee House, on street corners, anywhere, led to a joint seminar. There was also a work project,-the Santoshpur dispensary dedicated by the Health Minister of India and worked on by the initiating U.C.L.A. crew with Indian students pitching in. Continuously assessing the nature of the American group in terms of ethnic and individual effectiveness, as aware of the effect of the experience on these youngsters as of theirs on the Indians, responsive to methods of approach and their varying yields, the author writes in effect a personal case report of immediacy and pertinence particularly for youth groups seeking the most effective methods of teamwork and performance. The Project India story and the people who enacted it inspire the reader with the vigor of their good will and good work. Similar to Carl Rowan's report (The Proud and the Pitiful) on a younger and less politically probing level.

Pub Date: Sept. 10, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Crowell

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1956