With this, his sixth novel, Thomas H. Raddall has established himself as an interpreter of Canadian life at a rather rugged...

READ REVIEW

THE WINGS OF NIGHT

With this, his sixth novel, Thomas H. Raddall has established himself as an interpreter of Canadian life at a rather rugged level. The Nymph and the Lamp (AMP) published in 1950, was a vigorous portrait of life and its emotional concomitants on a lighthouse outpost; Tidefall, like the current story, used Nova Scotia as a setting. The Wings of Night presents a rather prickly character in Neil Jamieson, forester and veteran, who spent a major part of the war in a German prison camp, and who came back to a remote town in his native Nova Scotia to attempt to wipe his mind free of the claims of an unhappy childhood. But he finds it not so easy to do; his grandmother, who brought him up, is living in dire poverty, on a tiny pension, all the trappings of ancient grandeur gone, but still sturdily independent and proud. Neil starts an investigation of the forest areas that had been the Jamieson woods- and unearths some seamy doings. He finds too, that an adolescent- love still has its hold- though the girl, Louise, is married to the scion of the Big Shot in town, Senator Quarrender. The story, with its odd ramifications, builds up to Stephen Quarrender's death in hunting, to Neil's trial as the accused-and his acquittal, and to a surprise ending, which leaves some open questions. The story has a certain holding power, though the emotional values are not as telling as in the earlier books.

Pub Date: Sept. 20, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1956