One of the leading proponents of the ""God is dead"" school of contemporary theology sets forth here the main strands of...

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THE GOSPEL OF CHRISTIAN ATHEISM

One of the leading proponents of the ""God is dead"" school of contemporary theology sets forth here the main strands of that point of view. Both the strengths and the weaknesses of the school are evident. There is trenchant criticism of theology as traditionally carried on, and of the ecclesiastical establishment in which that theology has been embodied, as well as of the language in which it has been expressed. On the other hand, the author's own system of theological thought--if it can be called that--is encumbered by its own semantic difficulties, its non sequitur logic, and most of all, by a certain rigidity and tendency to dogmatic, unproven assertions. The core of his position is that God, the primordial being, has ""totally"" emptied himself of his sacred character in his incarnation in Jesus Christ--who is not necessarily the historical figure, Jesus--and thereby let loose a dynamic in which he now is incarnated in the totality of humanity. This process is irreversible. The primal God is, therefore, dead. Nietzsche, Hegel, and William Blake are the seminal sources for this point of view. The Biblical sources can no longer be drawn upon as they have been in the past. God is dead, but the ""present Word"" derived from Spirit, continues to live and work--whatever that may mean. The book should have wide reading, as well as a sobering, effect on those who may have been too ready to embrace this theological position without considering its weaknesses.

Pub Date: May 9, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Westminster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1966