The experiences of a party organizer in the derelict district outlying Rome known as Shanghai provides an object lesson of...

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REVOLT OF THE SINNERS

The experiences of a party organizer in the derelict district outlying Rome known as Shanghai provides an object lesson of the dissolution to which an undisciplined fervor may lead, as well as an example of the extremes of raw realism which the postwar Italian writers have reached. A youthful convert to Communism after his betrayal of the Church, he is assigned to Shanghai where the ""desperate, tattered misery"" of the poor is a fine breeding ground for political protest. The tearful recriminations of his father leave him unmoved; the association with Shotgun and Boatswain, more seasoned agitators, presage the violence which is to come; his own brief ""conjugal mishap"" with a collaborator, the metallie Zora, leaves him more susceptible to the easy sensuality of Gloria who had been born in Shangal and shares a solidarity with the people she refuses him A night of revolt, during which the people rise- to be shot down, ends with the bitter knowledge that he has lost his faith in the party- and Gloria's death accentuates his personal and political disillusion... A ravaged and relentless account, the shabby lives and sordid circumstances here will have little to attract an American audience.

Pub Date: Feb. 21, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Appleton-Century-Crofts

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1954