Mrs. Cobb, who used her kitchen as a lab in Science Experiments You Can Eat (KR 1971), now turns it into a studio and...

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ARTS AND CRAFTS YOU CAN EAT

Mrs. Cobb, who used her kitchen as a lab in Science Experiments You Can Eat (KR 1971), now turns it into a studio and invites readers to express themselves with chocolate marshmallow scratchboards, molded marzipan and the like. Unfortunately the sequel lacks the inherent cookery education value of its predecessor and one problem is that the projects included here -- ranging from stained glass cookies similar to Chernoff's, above, to a diced carrot, celery and almond mosaic in jello to cheese intaglio, radish roses and the ambitious cream puff and caramel Croquembouche -- are neither art (despite the introduction's high claims) nor especially appetizing. Another problem is that Lippman's casual line drawings, while agreeable enough for most purposes, are unlikely to convince anyone that the visual result will justify the preparation of -- for example -- mashed potato (""use instant if you wish"") and baby food casserole. Still the concept of edible crafts has obvious virtues, Mrs. Cobb has conscientiously explored its myriad possibilities, and kids can find both creative enjoyment and -- even if they fail as artists -- an earthier kind of satisfaction in making springerlee cookies with ""found"" molds, icing cakes with homemade equipment, painting cookies with their own edible tempera using egg yolk for an emulsifier, or just playing around with snack food sculpture.

Pub Date: April 15, 1974

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 126

Publisher: Lippincott

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1974