The saga of John McHallam's search for Jase Crane, known to have disappeared on Matam in the South Pacific, from which...

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THE VICTORY

The saga of John McHallam's search for Jase Crane, known to have disappeared on Matam in the South Pacific, from which legends of a blonde giant lead to the belief, in Jase' escaping death from the Japs. As writer for a documentary specialist team, McHallam becomes a member of the Hopi Victory bound, he hopes, for the island he to reach. The first half of the book chronicles the knitting together of the ship's morale, which, under the Captain, results in a ""good ship"". The latter half describe the finding of Jase, the importance of his story and what he has done for the Cha as their underground leader and idol, and the growth of the desire of the ship's to help the islanders too. Here, is a long, perhaps overlong, book, but never cut its pruned-Saroyan belief in the brotherhood of all men, the symbolic relationship as well as the distinct personalities of the men aboard ship and the men ashore, decencies and concepts, their abilities to live up to each other even if they can live up to the rules laid down for them. It is McHallam's story, told in warm, sometimes homely manner, as there is no point in which he fails to stress the natural, democratic size of the men he knew. It is not a war story as such, though the time 1944, but rather a war-backgrounded personal crusade whose and is victory for all concerned. Almost a credo, this is a far distant McHugh from I am Thinking of my Darling, Sing Before Breakfast.

Pub Date: Oct. 10, 1947

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Random House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1947