Subtitled I Study of the Interplay of Character and History- this bears the earmarks of being an expanded thesis for a...

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THE SCOT IN HISTORY

Subtitled I Study of the Interplay of Character and History- this bears the earmarks of being an expanded thesis for a doctorate. Or is it merely a professorial exposition, a comprehensive survey utterly lacking the spark that, for instance, Brogan might have given it. The data is all there. The chronology is followed in broad lines with emphasis on events chiefly as they conditioned national traits. Invasion, in early centuries, hammered contrasting racial strains into a nation. The Reformation set the mold for all time, and the Scots were untouched by the revival of classical learning, and inherited harshness and little of beauty, as epitomized by John Knox and the Books of Discipline, only mildly ameliorated in modern times. With the Union of 1707, the English influence strengthened; education brought some small measure of revolt. Through out, chapters or sections are interpolated, bearing on special subjects,- women, poverty society and talk, the Highlanders, etc. Three chapters are devoted to the rise of arts and letters. And final chapters expand the appraisal of English versus Scots. The lack of material on the subject will give this a definite place on reference shelves.

Pub Date: Oct. 22, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Yale

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1946